usingtherightwords

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Freddie Mercury Gets No Respect


When I was a kid playing Little League baseball, none of my teams had cheers that we would randomly shout during the games. In fact, until I reached college and started covering the softball team, I had never heard of such a thing. Like we really needed to be chattering in the dugout to keep things going.

These cheers extend all the way down to the youth level. They vary in creativity and length, but there is one in particular that gets my attention. It’s one in which the girls, to the tune of Queen’s “We Will Rock You,” start singing:

Turned on my radio, what did I hear?

Elvis Presley singing our cheer;

Singing we will, we will rock you down, shake you up

Like a volcano  ready to erupt …

First of all, I always get a kick out of children name-checking someone who not only died long before they were born, he was dead before some of their parents were born (I was 9 on the day Elvis left the building).

Second, and this is pertinent here, the kids should really be saying, “… Freddie Mercury singing our cheer …” because it is Mercury’s vocal they’re aping. Too bad he doesn’t get the credit (nor does Brian May, who wrote the song).

I think it’s because Elvis is so much more famous (even though he died in 1977; Mercury died in 1991 — after many of these kids’ parents were born). Then again, I don’t know who writes these cheers.

Until next time! Use the right words!

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leebarnathan.com

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November 3, 2015 - Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , ,

1 Comment »

  1. […] Standing behind the plate also means I hear things, such as cheers. […]

    Pingback by Outside is Outside « usingtherightwords | April 14, 2016 | Reply


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