usingtherightwords

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Did I Really Lose That Money?


One of my many jobs is to officiate youth sports such as volleyball, softball and soccer. I find it a great financial supplement and it helps me get my sports fix.

One of the drawbacks of such a job is that games sometimes get canceled or postponed due to rain, fire, excessive heat or a school not having enough players to field a team. When that happens, and I can’t work the rescheduled date, I lose money.

Or do I? People tell me that I really don’t lose money because I never had it. And it’s true that lost means “no longer possessed,” among other definitions.

Yet although I never had it, I had an agreement that if I showed up and officiated, I would get paid. Circumstances beyond anyone’s control interfered with that agreement, so I did not work and did not get paid.

Maybe what I should say is, “I lost the opportunity to make the money.” Good thing I never spend the money until I get it.

Furthermore, to lose means “to suffer the deprivation of,” and I certainly feel like I suffer when I don’t get the money. My wallet is deprived. Yet the examples given with this definition are “to lose one’s job” and “to lose one’s life.” In those instances, a person would have had a job or a life before losing it; I never had the money, only an agreement.

To the wordsmith, it might seem clear that I have not lost any money. I can assure you that to the self-employed person scrambling and hustling and trying to make a decent living in a city where it is becoming increasingly difficult to make a living wage, it feels like I lose money every time.

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

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March 20, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What You Wish You Could Say to a Customer Service Representative


It’s nice to be known for something. I recently received the following email:

Hi Lee,

I was looking over old blog posts today (mine, not yours) and came across one (from Nov. 2013) that made me think of you. I had described how I had called Virgin Mobile to ask them if there was any way to download pictures from my phone other than emailing each one individually. The response had been that, on a flip phone (which is what I had at the time), that was the only way.

Then my blog post contained the following two lines:

“Then he said, ‘Is there anything else I can help you with?’ I didn’t say my first thought, which was, ‘You haven’t helped me with anything, yet,’ or even my second thought, which was, ‘Can you not end your sentences with prepositions?’

I have the distinct impression that, had you been in my shoes that day, you would have had the same two initial thoughts – whether or not you would have expressed them or not, I can’t say.

Most likely, I would thought the first but not the second. But I wish I could utter both.

Thanks to Jackie Z. for the email.

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

March 15, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Networking Meeting Miscommunications


As long as there are humans, and as long as there is communication, there will be human miscommunication, as the following examples overheard at networking meetings show:

I do the same thing but differently — Um, OK. How?

My skin-care products protect against free radicals — But paid radicals are a different story, right?

I could talk for a day, but I’d like to go further — I don’t want to hear you talk for a day, let alone more than that! At least he used further correctly.

If you need an extra 100 percent for a party … — Sorry, I don’t have anymore to give.

If your mess causes you stress, and sometimes little kids … I could go so many ways with this one, but I’ll stick with, isn’t it the mess that got you little kids, and the stress, in the first place?

And finally, a joke I like:

At a networking meeting, everyone was asked to conclude their 30-second commercial/elevator pitch by telling where they wanted to retire. One guy said, “I’ll retire when I need new Michelins!”

I laughed. Nobody else visibly or vocally reacted.

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

March 13, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

They Didn’t Hear What They Said


Listen, my children, and you shall hear, some failing words to not revere.

I heard networkers say the following, and I shake my head and wonder. In the last example, I shake my head and laugh.

You saw the launch of Elon Musk — No, I saw the launch of a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket that carried one of Musk’s Tesla Roadster. Musk, as far as I know, is still on Earth.

I’m opening a restaurant on the moon. The food is great, but there isn’t any atmosphere — In addition to the rim shot, I’d like to add that there is atmosphere on the moon. Granted, it’s very scant, almost negligible compared to Earth and inhospitable to humans, but it’s an atmosphere just the same.

Because I’m in this group, I went to my first marijuana store — Just being in this networking group has nothing to do with going to a marijuana store.  The speaker might have meant, “Because I’m in this group, you’ll appreciate that I went to my first marijuana store.”

I thought my car was dying on the vine — OK, I’ve got two problems here. First, “dying on the vine” is a cliche, and we all know that you should avoid cliches like the plague.

Second, a car doesn’t die on the vine. Tomatoes do. Grapes do. Cars don’t. They die on the road, or in a garage or driveway; or in the case of certain sequels, on movie screens (I’m looking at you, Pixar).

Now, I realize that to die on the vine means “to fail, as from lack of support, especially at an early stage.” I know this could happen to a car — and if it did, it would be a lemon, which grows on trees and, therefore, can’t die on a vine.

What’s the biggest reason people don’t get their picture taken? They’re ugly! — A photographer asked the question; another networker answered. I wish I had thought of it.

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

March 8, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Read This and Try not to Wince


I am in the process of revamping my networking pitches. I want to alternate educating and inspiring that I can solve people’s communication problems.

Regarding education, I’ve taken to printing up and showing signs that I’ve found online that exemplify bad communication, for one reason or another.

The photo below, of a Dairy Queen, is an example of a double meaning. Too bad the persons responsible didn’t realize it.

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

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March 6, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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