usingtherightwords

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If You Consider Shakespeare a Genius, Read On


My favorite Shakespeare comedy is “Twelfth Night, or What You Will.” I bring this up because my daughter will soon perform the role of Olivia in a production of it. She and I have had many conversations about the play, most stemming from my love of the character Malvolio and who should play it in the production she’s in.

There’s also our disagreement of what is the most famous line from the play. I firmly believe it is “Some are born great, some achieve greatness and others have greatness thrust upon them.” She thinks it’s the first line: “If music be the food of love, play on.” We also disagree on whether the “some are born great” line actually originates from “Twelfth Night” or if it’s in another play. She insists it’s from somewhere else; I can’t find any reference to any other work.

Regardless, we know Shakespeare has so permeated our language. We know many famous quotes: To be or not to be, wherefore art thou, what fools these mortals be, something wicked this way comes, to thine own self be true, full of sound and fury signifying nothing, et tu Brute, the fault is not in our stars, there are more things in heaven and earth, and so on, and so on, and so on.

But I wanted to go beyond the most famous. I wanted to see how mundane I could get. As today is the 402nd anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, just for fun I searched “quotes you know that come from Shakespeare” to see what would come up. Imagine my surprise to learn all of the following are from the Bard.

As good luck would have it from “The Merry Wives of Windsor”

Bated breath from “The Merchant of Venice”

Brave new world from “The Tempest”

Cold comfort from “King John”

Dead as a doornail from “Henry VI, Part 2”

Devil incarnate from “Titus Andronicus”

Eaten me out of house and home from “Henry IV, Part”

For goodness’ sake from “Henry VIII”

Forever and a day from “As You Like It”

Good riddance from “Troilus and Cressida”

Green-eyed monster from “Othello”

Heart of gold from “Henry V”

It’s Greek to me from “Julius Caesar”

Knock knock! Who’s there from “Macbeth”

Let slip the dogs of war from “Julius Caesar”

Off with his head from “Richard III”

Refuse to budge an inch from “The Taming of the Shrew”

Seen better days from “As You Like It”

The be-all and the end-all from “Macbeth”

The game’s afoot from “Henry V”

Too much of a good thing from “As You Like It”

Wild goose chase from “Romeo and Juliet”

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

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April 23, 2018 - Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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