usingtherightwords

Guaranteed to improve your English

If You Believe This, You Probably Believed the Russians Didn’t Affect Your Vote


I received the following email. The less said about it, the better.

Listen, for your own good, please  Stop  sending your hard earn money to Impostors/fraudsters who always claims to be Government officials and staffs of so many Banks in Nigeria, GHANA, South Africa, Benin Republic, UK , Switzerland, Malaysia, Indonesia, China, Canada.

I am telling you this because from our monitoring Gadget on fraud practice going on in the whole world today,I noticed that some Nigerian  corrupt officials who contacted you  previously have engage themselves with Mr.Godwin Emefiele, Governor, Central bank of Nigeria to blacklist your payment file in Nigeria so that your payment will not be release on time as they are making more profit with your overdue
payment by given out loan to people both in Nigeria and Abroad .

Through our investigation in Central Bank of Nigeria few days ago with our monitoring Gadget on fraud activities, I discovered that some Nigerian  corrupt officials and Mr.Godwin Emefiele, Governor, Central bank of Nigeria have been demanding unnecessary fees from you and anytime you sent money to them, they will come back with another different story in less than 48 hours to tell you to send more money again and again and at the end of it, no success on your payment release.

 Meaning that their intention is to get you frustrated so that they will have more time  to trade with your overdue payment by given out loan to people both in Nigeria and Abroad.

Anyway, I don't  know if you have take your time and ask yourself why each time Mr.Godwin Emefiele, Governor, Central bank of Nigeria release OR approve  your payment, then  all of A sudden, the payment will get stopped or one problem or the other will come up?  Listen, It is because that some Nigerian  corrupt officials and Mr.Godwin Emefiele, Governor, Central bank of Nigeria have blacklisted your payment
file as they are making more profit with your payment by given out loan to people .

Now in other to make things easy for you and also to remove you from too much stress, I have contacted the Nigerian Ambassador in USA Mr.Sylvanus Adiewere Nsofor to visit the BB&T Bank in USA and then sign the Nigerian Fund Release Debit Approval Document on behalf of the Federal Government of Nigeria to release your part payment
valued US$10,000,000.00 through our Oil reserve account with BB&T Bank in USA so that Mr. Christopher L. Henson , President & Chief Operating Officer BB&T BANK in USA will be able to Debit a sum of US$10M from our Oil reserve account with BB&T Bank in USA and then transfer it to your Nominated Bank account as your part
payment.

Please kindly contact Mr. Christopher L. Henson , President & Chief Operating Officer BB&T BANK, USA through his direct contact email here in Bracket ( email deleted here   ) and endeavor to furnish him with your full Bank details for Immediate transfer of your part payment valued US$10M.

Please endeavor to let Mr. Christopher L. Henson , President & Chief Operating Officer BB&T BANK, USA to know if you want your payment by Bank to Bank transfer OR by ATM CARD.

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

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July 27, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Did Omar Bradley Create a Cliché?


Every so often, I hear someone say something like, “He/She/I was at the wrong place at the wrong time.” I know what  it means: Said person was at a location at the exact time something bad would happen.

Still, can you be at the right place at the wrong time? The wrong place at the right time? Why do so few say, “I was at the right place at the right time?” Usually, they just say, “I was lucky.”

I went searching for the origins of this cliché. The earliest mention I could find was of Gen. Omar Bradley, as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, telling a Congressional hearing on May 15, 1951, that he opposed extending the Korean War into China: “… this strategy would involve us in the wrong war, at the wrong place, at the wrong time, and with the wrong enemy.”

Since then, presidential candidate John F. Kennedy, General Anthony Zinni, historian Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.,  Governor Howard Dean and then-Senator John Kerry have used Bradley’s words to criticize President George W. Bush’s handling of the Iraq War. Bush himself rebuked Kerry for using it.

This cliché has also appeared as a 1996 song by Marc Chesnutt (“Wrong Place, Wrong Time”) and no fewer than six book titles on amazon.com.

I always thought this cliché dated further back. It still might, but I haven’t yet been able to find proof.

Thanks to Bruce G. for the idea.

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

March 11, 2014 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Does Your City Need A State/Country?


When writing names of cities, one might wonder if he/she needs to include a state after it.

The rule is simple: The more familiar the city’s name, the less likely it needs a state or country.

U.S. cities such as New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Atlanta, San Francisco, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Miami and Dallas don’t require a state because it’s understood that enough people know these cities are  in New York, California, Illinois, Georgia, California, Pennsylvania, Arizona, Florida and Texas, respectively.

Similarly, cities such as London, Paris, Berlin, Madrid, Moscow, Jerusalem, Cairo, Shanghai and Tokyo need no countries because enough people know these are in England, France, Germany, Spain, Russia, Israel, Egypt, China and Japan, respectively.

The problems arise when you have cities that few have heard, such as Lubbock or Palmdale or Davenport. Do enough people know these are in Texas, California and Iowa, respectively? Probably not.

What about Birmingham, Athens or St. Petersburg? Are they in Alabama, Georgia and Florida, or are they in England, Greece and Russia? You need a city or country with cities such as these.

There’s no shame in needing/not needing a qualifying city/state. It just means you’re smaller but no less special.

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

June 19, 2013 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Table Tennis By Any Other Name


I fondly remember the late 1970s-early 1980s as, among other things, a time when it seemed everybody, my family included, played table tennis in their garages. Oh, the balls slamming and the serves spinning — I can still hear the sounds of paddle on ball and ball on table.

Of course, most of us, again myself included, rarely called the game table tennis. We called it ping-pong or pingpong.

Which is correct? The answer comes courtesy of about.com. It cites the International Table Tennis Federation as saying the name “table tennis” first appeared as a board and dice game in 1887. John Jacques registered Ping-Pong as a trade name in England in 1901, and Parker Brothers bought the rights from him that same year. Also in 1901, The Table Tennis Association and The Ping-Pong Association formed. They merged in 1903 and died out in 1904.

The game saw a revival in the 1920s, and people used the term table tennis to get around Parker Brothers’ trademark. Today, the serious players still call the game table tennis; the more recreational players and Chinese professionals use ping-pong. But since that name remains trademarked (Hasbro now holds it), people write pingpong as a generic term.

Spell it “T-A-B-L-E  T-E-N-N-I-S” to avoid Hasbro’s wrath.

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

 

 

 

February 6, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Using “Over” vs. “More Than”


This one kills me because it’s so simple, yet people misuse over over and over.

Over has 34 different definitions in my Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary, but none of them refer to an amount. That’s when you use more than:  I paid more than $300 for this job, but it was worth it. Joe is more than 50 years old. Yao Ming is more than seven feet tall. He is NOT over seven feet tall,” nor is that airplane flying “over 35,000 feet.”

OK? Over and out.

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

July 8, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

   

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