usingtherightwords

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If You Believe This, You Probably Believed the Russians Didn’t Affect Your Vote


I received the following email. The less said about it, the better.

Listen, for your own good, please  Stop  sending your hard earn money to Impostors/fraudsters who always claims to be Government officials and staffs of so many Banks in Nigeria, GHANA, South Africa, Benin Republic, UK , Switzerland, Malaysia, Indonesia, China, Canada.

I am telling you this because from our monitoring Gadget on fraud practice going on in the whole world today,I noticed that some Nigerian  corrupt officials who contacted you  previously have engage themselves with Mr.Godwin Emefiele, Governor, Central bank of Nigeria to blacklist your payment file in Nigeria so that your payment will not be release on time as they are making more profit with your overdue
payment by given out loan to people both in Nigeria and Abroad .

Through our investigation in Central Bank of Nigeria few days ago with our monitoring Gadget on fraud activities, I discovered that some Nigerian  corrupt officials and Mr.Godwin Emefiele, Governor, Central bank of Nigeria have been demanding unnecessary fees from you and anytime you sent money to them, they will come back with another different story in less than 48 hours to tell you to send more money again and again and at the end of it, no success on your payment release.

 Meaning that their intention is to get you frustrated so that they will have more time  to trade with your overdue payment by given out loan to people both in Nigeria and Abroad.

Anyway, I don't  know if you have take your time and ask yourself why each time Mr.Godwin Emefiele, Governor, Central bank of Nigeria release OR approve  your payment, then  all of A sudden, the payment will get stopped or one problem or the other will come up?  Listen, It is because that some Nigerian  corrupt officials and Mr.Godwin Emefiele, Governor, Central bank of Nigeria have blacklisted your payment
file as they are making more profit with your payment by given out loan to people .

Now in other to make things easy for you and also to remove you from too much stress, I have contacted the Nigerian Ambassador in USA Mr.Sylvanus Adiewere Nsofor to visit the BB&T Bank in USA and then sign the Nigerian Fund Release Debit Approval Document on behalf of the Federal Government of Nigeria to release your part payment
valued US$10,000,000.00 through our Oil reserve account with BB&T Bank in USA so that Mr. Christopher L. Henson , President & Chief Operating Officer BB&T BANK in USA will be able to Debit a sum of US$10M from our Oil reserve account with BB&T Bank in USA and then transfer it to your Nominated Bank account as your part
payment.

Please kindly contact Mr. Christopher L. Henson , President & Chief Operating Officer BB&T BANK, USA through his direct contact email here in Bracket ( email deleted here   ) and endeavor to furnish him with your full Bank details for Immediate transfer of your part payment valued US$10M.

Please endeavor to let Mr. Christopher L. Henson , President & Chief Operating Officer BB&T BANK, USA to know if you want your payment by Bank to Bank transfer OR by ATM CARD.

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

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July 27, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Proof Isn’t in the Pudding


I have my first book coming out soon, If You Experience Death, Please Call and Other Fatal Mistakes We Make With Language, in which I make fun of the words people (myself included) use. At a recent networking event, I thought I had found an example that I could put in a subsequent book.

The speaker, hailing from South Africa, said, “The proof in the pudding is in the eating.”

I had never heard this. I knew “The proof is in the pudding,” but I didn’t know anything about the eating.

So, I looked it up — and found the speaker had it more right than I realized.

First, the true original proverb, from William Camden’s Remaines of a Greater Worke, Concerning Britaine (first published in 1605 with subsequent editions in 1614 and 1623): “All the proof of a pudding is in the eating.” Its meaning: “To fully test something, you need to experience it yourself.”

I can’t tell which edition this first appeared, as various sources state different years, but most say either 1605, the first edition, or 1623, the third edition and also the year Camden died. What is known is that Camden’s Remaines is often the earliest or sole usage cited for a word in the Oxford English Dictionary.

Also, pudding doesn’t refer to the dessert we know today. Back then, according to the OED, the medieval pudding was “the stomach or one of the entrails of a pig, sheep, or other animal, stuffed with a mixture of minced meat, suet, oatmeal, seasoning, etc., and boiled.” Today, it most closely resembles haggis.

I don’t know if the speaker knew any of this history. What I do know is that, according to World Wide Words, American newspapers have been getting this wrong since the 1920s; it’s been more commonly butchered after the mid-1950s.

I no longer will get it wrong, and now I hope you won’t either. We have a South African to thank.

Thank you, Arnie H.

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

August 31, 2015 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Let’s Get to the “Roots” of the Problem


I love Netflix (despite the incredibly high price increase from last year) because I can go back and watch movies, television shows or miniseries that I missed the first time around. I’m currently watching the last disc of  “Roots,” which I didn’t watch when it premiered in 1977 because I was too young.

Anyone who has watched “Roots” knows the various names (today we’d call them epithets) white people called the slaves and what the slaves called each other. By today’s standards, the words are incendiary, insulting, rude and racist. Unfortunately, that’s the way it was.

It’s not that way today. Now, we have the terms African-American and black. Which do you use? Whatever the person prefers. But be careful. Technically speaking, only people who can trace their ancestry directly to Africa can be called African-American. President Obama is a prime example. He was born in Hawaii to a Kenyan father and an American mother.

I once knew a white woman who could make the same designation. She was born in South Africa and became an American citizen later. I remember her telling me the looks she got when she (correctly) listed herself as African-American on job applications and then met hiring officers for interviews.

If ancestry can’t be determined, and if you can’t reach the person to find  his or her preference, use black because that is the skin color.

Happy Black History Month! Happy Lincoln’s Birthday (a day late)! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

February 13, 2012 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

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