usingtherightwords

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Shakespeare Would Not Be Proud


My daughter currently performs as Hortensio in William Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew.” I believe that if you can do Shakespeare, you can do anything on stage.

Unfortunately, that does not extend to the actor bios in the program, which had the following typos in it:

“She would like to thank William Shupespeare…” Who? You mean Will Shupe, the director? Oh.

“(name of performer) is excited to be apart of this production! I’d rather be part of it.

“She loves Shakespeare and the character Katrina …” Both the original text and this program list the character name as “Katharina,” although it is pronounced “Katrina.”

“She would like to thank Will Shupe and the other co-assistant directors…” Will Shupe is the director.

Perhaps I should not nitpick. This is a student performance, and the students wrote their own bios. But still, someone should have edited it.

And no, my daughter’s bio does not contain any typos, even though she didn’t let me see it until it was in the program.

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

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May 18, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ham and Eggs Green, a Tempest and a Dream


Apologies to Dr. Seuss and Shakespeare, but…

And to think I heard it at a networking meeting!

A construction worker spoke about flipping houses. I wondered how strong one has to be to physically do that.

The man continued, talking about how he can build a home “from the ground up.”

As opposed to, “from the sky down?”

Oh, the words I have heard!

At a different networking meeting, a printer started speaking about what be does for his clients. The guy next to me whispered, “He’s not flat, so he must be a 3D printer.”

I rolled my eyes.

Lord, what fools these mortals be!

Until next time! Use the right words!

It’s here! My début book, “If You Experience Death, Please Call: And Other Fatal Mistakes We Make With Language” is available on Amazon for only $14.95.  Order here.

leebarnathan.com

June 7, 2016 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Must all Poets’ “Verses” Come Down to Us “Versus” Them?


As a former full-time (and still occasional) sportswriter, I’m quite familiar with versus. As an English speaker, I also know verses. Yet sometimes I see them misused.

The most common mangling is when someone wants to pit something verses something else, which to me is like pitting poet against poet, Shakespeare against Frost: To be or not to be on the road less traveled…

The writer, of course, means versus. Sports enthusiasts will recognize the abbreviation vs., which is always correct. Less correct is Vs., a hard-to-find cable sports channel.

Until next time! Use the right words!

leebarnathan.com

December 29, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment